Robert Rosenthal

According to Greek mythology, a kindly and wise King of Cyprus, and unsurpassed sculptor, Pygmalion name, it was looking head for a woman whose beauty was perfect, in order to marry with her. Long went looking for her. So much that to not find it, he decided to devote the rest of his time, and so his love, to sculpt the most beautiful female statues. So he erected the statue of a beautiful young woman who christened Galatea, so beautiful that he could not help falling in love her madly. Both it was thus, that sleeping dreamed that the statue’s creative life.

Ovid, in his metamorphoses describes it thus: ‘Pygmalion approached the statue and, by touching it, it seemed it was hot, the Ivory will soften and that deposing its hardness, it ceded to the fingers gently (). Let’s see, Pygmalion is filled with a great joy mixed fear, believing that it deceived. He returned to play the statue again, and ascertained that it was a flexible body and veins gave their keystrokes to explore them with your fingers.. When he woke up from the dream, replacing the effigy was Aphrodite, who addressed him: deserve happiness, a happiness that you’ve captured. Here the Queen you wanted. Love it and defend it from evil. Thus, mythologically, Galatea, in principle of stone, was transformed into a woman of flesh and blood. In 1968, Robert Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobson, after a curious investigation: Pygmalion in the classroom, concluded that the expectations and beliefs of teachers on the students acted in favour of its compliance, and so were the teachers themselves who ended up turning their perception in confirmation of what they expected from the students. Many areas of knowledge, has seen this process in psychology called Pygmalion effect, by which the beliefs and expectations of a person or group with respect to an individual, affect so his conduct, which the second tends to confirm them.

This entry was posted in News and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.